All Saints' Episcopal Church

To You… (A Blue Christmas Homily)

Photo by 一 徐 from Pexels

A brief homily given on December 19, 2021 by the Rev. Teri Daily…

In Luke’s Christmas story, shepherds were in the region of Bethlehem, watching their sheep that holy night. An angel of the Lord stood before them, and they were sore afraid. But then the angel said, “Fear not; for see – I am bringing you good news of great joy for all the people: to you is born this day in the city of David a Savior, who is the Messiah, the Lord. This will be a sign for you: you will find a child wrapped in bands of cloth and lying in a manger.”

When the angel tells the shepherds “To you is born this day in the city of David a Savior, who is the Messiah, the Lord,” we hear these words as being addressed to people just like us. In fact, these words are addressed to us. The “you” in “to you is born this day in the city of David a Savior” speaks to chronological layers of recipients – the shepherds in the field, the people of Israel, the people for whom the evangelist Luke wrote, and “you” is us as well.

It’s easy to think that Christmas is about something that happened in the past, almost 2000 years ago. And it is, but Christmas is also so much more than that. Christmas is about God coming to us, living with and in us. All the while knowing the joys and pain of human life because, in Jesus, God has experienced them.

To you is born this day in the city of David a Savior.” To you. To you who know the pain of illness, of relentless treatment, of poor or uncertain outcomes. To you who struggle with doubt and fear. To you who find life over-whelming and take no time for a deep breath.  To you who know the pain of losing someone dear, to you who struggle with addiction, to you who have experienced a broken home. To you who are isolated and alone. To you who know the emptiness of a bare pantry, and to you who hunger spiritually.  To you who look for hope, and to you who have lost even the hope of finding it.  To you for whom the holidays bring painful and difficult memories. To you…

Isaiah prophesied that “The people who walked in darkness have seen a great light.” God’s people have known darkness. So if we find ourselves in times of darkness, too – that’s OK. Perhaps we, more than most, will see the first rays of Christmas when it comes.

To You… (A Blue Christmas Homily)
Scroll to top